poetry

This is education

IMG_9957Today is the anniversary of the death of Ken Campbell, anarchist polymath genius.

Reader of everything. Writer. Performer. Creator. Stand up comedian, speculative fictioneer, improviser, paranomasiac, marvelling revelling adventurer in existence.

Public outreach educator and life-long learning experimenter in ways beyond the wildest imaginings of Proper Professionals in these fields before they or these fields even existed. The next time you consider using words like “innovation,” “innovative,” “innovator”: have some respect. Think first. Check with reference to Ken. If philology provides a theoretical meaning, it is Ken who provides—incarnates—a reference-point for lived active practice.

As we academics start the new year, welcome new students, and train new graduate-student Teaching Assistants, please consider giving half an hour of your time to Ken; from whom one can learn more, and more deeply, in that time than in a year’s worth of Professionalisation Training Programmes by Proper Education Specialists.

I miss Ken.

I love this video and hope you do too. May watching Ken again become an annual ritual, a commemoration to bring in the academic new year.

(TW: Contains death and diddling, and Latin and love.)

Cheese scones are my madeleines

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Ceci n’est pas l’apprentissage littéraire

Or: why I don’t write book reviews. (more…)

#innovation: the soundtrack

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On the naming of things

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Once upon a time, there was a knight called Sir Topiass who turned into a tree… and then into something else…

On Saturday, the Obrienaternal household paid one of its occasional visits to the VanDusen Botanical Gardens, one of Vancouver’s vegetative delights, for some leisurely herboriser. (more…)

Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (4): the 12th-13th + resources

Still desperately scurrying and scuttling to catch up with our world of the last two weeks. This fourth post is the last of a short sequence just on one mere week; the next batch of posts will try to catch up with and start to make sense of last week (14-20 November).

Clunky screenshots, but as with the previous posts in the series, all Twitterer references have been included (if there’s no attribution, then it’s me). Also as before: this is an apologetically haphazardly sketchy snapshot en mots e sons e images.

Some words: remembrance, resistance, resilience, relevance, resources.

And, to quote Octavia E. Butler:

The word, again, is “persist”!

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Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (3): the 11th

A day of remembrance, and thus also of song and of poetry.

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50 years ago: philology, decolonisation, deconstruction


Image above: from the Gradual of Saint-Etienne of Toulouse, France (Toulouse), last quarter of the 11th-first quarter of the 12th century, British Library Harley MS 4951, f. 299v (more…)

#femfog avant la lettre, #fembuée, & #femflow

(For Eileen Joy.)

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(Also a post about how reading works. (Book of Hours, The Master of Evert Zoudenbalch. Active Utrecht, ca. 1460. Via Miranda Bloem a.k.a. @Zweder_Masters))

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Occitan Lyric Poetry as Defence Against the Dark Arts

Full version of a talk given at the 15th Triennial Congress of the International Courtly Literature Society; University of Kentucky, Lexington; 24-29 July 2016 (some parts cut or expanded on the fly, as is usual for live talks).

It includes a selection of medieval Occitan poetry (with Englishings) that might be interesting and perhaps even useful to general readers, feminists, anti-rape activists, paranomasiacs, comedians, and assorted other 21st century live human beings (and any other intelligences not covered above).

There are also pictures.

Including, as promised to a certain amic, owls.

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#WhanthatAprilleDay16 – Guilhem de Peitieus / Old Occitan

Phylologystes unite, lat us maken melodye

  
This post is for
mon aisimen et aizi
mon compagnon en eisil
celui per cui fui trobatz
alter dicat:

Guilhem de Peitieus (1071 – 1127) (more…)