31 August is Ken Campbell Day: diddling and doodling, seekers, and radical education

A STICKY POST: 31 August – 31 December 2018

It is time for the annual pilgrimage. So as to make this a slower and longer pilgrimage than last year, to commemorate a 10th anniversary (well, two: the death of a central person and the birth of a marginal blog), this post is a “sticky” one and will stay here for a whole academic term, all the way to its end and the end of the year; and it contains various kinds of “stickiness” played out in three Acts: revisiting 2017, 2018, and Campbellian education in action.

IMG_9957ACT I: REVISITING 2017

Today is the anniversary of the death of Ken Campbell, anarchist polymath genius.

Reader of everything. Writer. Performer. Creator. Stand up comedian, speculative fictioneer, improviser, paranomasiac, marvelling revelling adventurer in existence.

Public outreach educator and life-long learning experimenter in ways beyond the wildest imaginings of Proper Professionals in these fields before they or these fields even existed. The next time you consider using words like “innovation,” “innovative,” “innovator”: have some respect. Think first. Check with reference to Ken. If philology provides a theoretical meaning, it is Ken who provides—incarnates—a reference-point for lived active practice. (more…)

On revising for exams (2018 version)

Welcome to this year’s updated version of the revision guide for one of the courses that I coordinate, beginners’ French. The original post is at UBC Blogs > FREN 101 & 102 Resources > Révisions : FREN 101. Its ancestor is at that course’s old site and first appeared there in 2014; I made a new site for this year as part of redesigning the course. Of course, the main actual exam revision guidance and general exam season guidance haven’t changed since then, nor indeed have they since predecessors that circulated orally; I’d say the same things in the last class every term in every language, literature, and culture course I’ve ever taught, back to 2001. (Does such guidance ever change? The classic complaint and old lament of traditional knowledge dismissed as non-knowledge, until it is stolen for profit by others and translated into authoritative publication and official sanction.)


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Making beginners’ French more inclusive: reflexive verbs (introduction) with bonobos

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Conceptually-difficult French: se reposer et se détendre

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On translation (including a very short story)

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Translating the Old Occitan Romance of Enimia for #AcWriMo (1)

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PROLOGUE

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is happening at the moment in the USA, there’s Academic Writing Month (AcWriMo) worldwide this month too, and there was National Translation Month (NTM) in September. And then there’s a wobbly intermediate intersecting zone, of translating old stuff into new stuff. Welcome to the first post of the serialised Saint Enimia from the Bertran de Marcilia Old Occitan poem. This translation is one of my writing projects this academic year; on which, see “Remembering there’s a HAG in hagiography, Saint Enimia on her feast-day” (6 October 2018) and some older posts(more…)

Poeticising language learning for beginners (feat. Apollinaire for #ApollinR18)

7E0F4A9A-6C48-4D24-B5A9-6E32507A3128Welcome to a second post remembrancing Guillaume Apollinaire, through keeping his poetry alive by sharing it with others and opening it up to continued reading and to creative continuation. It’s never too late or too early to start: this post is about an assignment for a beginners’ French course (UBC FREN 101). The assignment itself can be adapted to put into practice a range of lexical and grammatic knowledge and can be tweaked to different learning levels, and its underlying raison d’être ideas can be translated to other languages (modern or ancient, living or dead or sleeping) and their cultures.
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