Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (4): the 12th-13th + resources

Still desperately scurrying and scuttling to catch up with our world of the last two weeks. This fourth post is the last of a short sequence just on one mere week; the next batch of posts will try to catch up with and start to make sense of last week (14-20 November).

Clunky screenshots, but as with the previous posts in the series, all Twitterer references have been included (if there’s no attribution, then it’s me). Also as before: this is an apologetically haphazardly sketchy snapshot en mots e sons e images.

Some words: remembrance, resistance, resilience, relevance, resources.

And, to quote Octavia E. Butler:

The word, again, is “persist”!

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Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (3): the 11th

A day of remembrance, and thus also of song and of poetry.

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Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (2): the 9th & 10th

Resistance and remembrance

A feeling of

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Trobar sen / trying to make sense of November (1): up to the 8th

Work in progress. In no particular order, except the chronological. Further verbiage may be added later.

(Above: soundtrack/~scape from MDVL301A last week.)

This has been a long month on Twitter, and we’re only three-quarters of the way. (more…)

On reading, writing, & commentary

PROLOGUE

The original title of this piece is “Criticism & commentary,” but it’s really about reading and writing as harmoniously-integrated activities within the larger whole that is a literary continuum and polyphonic collective; uniting all participants in a living textual network.

Premises and provisos: It views commentary as one of the core and ancient literary/communicative forms, along with story-telling and translation; with story-telling as the living beating heart of this human trinity of curiosity, criticism, and creativity.

It uses literature in its broad sense to extend to “any object that can be read, seen, interpreted” and reading in the broad / Barthes sense to include perception by any of the senses, with “making sense of” as its purpose, and an interpretation translated into expression via any of the senses.  This piece sees literature as synonymous with communicative expression. Not as one kind of communication, but the other way around:  what passes in other (non-literary) fields as “communication” is a more or less appropriately human, or humanly-appropriate, kind of literature. All writing has a right, duty, and responsibility to be beautiful, imaginative and innovative, and critical and creative. All writing can and should be literature. 

What follows below is the current version, for students who are reading and writing, from MDVL 301A : European Literature of the 5th to the 14th centuries – “The Liberal Arts”Its base was the version used in MDVL 302: European Literature of the 14th to the 16th centuries – “Criticism” (UBC, Faculty of Arts, Medieval Studies Programme, AY 2011-12 Winter session term 2) + a couple of upates (ex. on plagiarism and style guides). It’s one of the oldest pieces on this present blog; its most ancient archaeological layer (writing resources) is from a now-deceased previous site, “The Rose of the Romance” (2003).

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