medieval literature

more of the same: continuations (caveat lector: contains Game of Thrones references)

The previous post talked about continuations, haunted by the spectre that haunts us all, growing awareness of being in the anthropocene and impending doom. Doom and dooms. Winter, as they say, is coming.

“Happy” World Goth Day yesterday. (more…)

Translating rape in “Flamenca” (2)

In the previous post, we saw how the rape of Flamenca was read and written by several translators: from a mysterious medieval hand behind a marginal manicule, to translations published over the last ten years. That is: how, in the narrow and broad senses, her rape was “translated.” This second post looks at how rape was translated out of Flamenca: going beyond the usual senses of translation that include transposition, movement to a different place, away from one language and culture and into another; this translation is one of displacement and removal. Flamenca’s rape is translated out of existence. (more…)

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas …

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas. All of them had a kernel of narratio fabulosa truth in common.

ef62401f-5e92-4e73-a276-86c8bf80e4fc
(more…)

The consolation and living magic of old poetry

img_7861“Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War”
British Library, 19 October 2018 to 19 February 2019.
Information: https://www.bl.uk/events/anglo-saxon-kingdoms

An exhibition just opened in London, at the British Library, which is by all accounts sublime and has been stunning colleagues who work in medieval English literature and history, and many other lovers of all things beautiful and old. (more…)

Notes: on medieval poetic community and marvellous / uncanny strangeness

Oez merveilluse aventure
Cum genz sunt d’estrange nature

(Thomas, “Le Mariage de Tristan” ll. 234-35)
54FDA9DA-EDC9-4F54-98E3-95EBC257A80C
(more…)