philology

On the naming of things

IMG_1983

Once upon a time, there was a knight called Sir Topiass who turned into a tree… and then into something else…

On Saturday, the Obrienaternal household paid one of its occasional visits to the VanDusen Botanical Gardens, one of Vancouver’s vegetative delights, for some leisurely herboriser. (more…)

AcciDEntal SCROTUS: allegory is all around when medievalising moDErn French teaching

IMG_9095
(more…)

Happy #HugAMedievalistDay

Hug a Medievalist.

Because #medievaltwitter is amongst the finest public scholarship, breaking barriers of academia, bringing “outsiders” in.

Because Medievalists are able to go beyond the weaker—impoverished and impoverishing—recent idea of out-reach, back to its roots and underlying essential qualities, where they can perform alchemical philological magic to reveal a potent quintessence and share that openly and freely and equitably with the world for the greater and limitless enrichment of all. Why would you “perform outreach” when you could in-embrace-one-other instead, in brotherly or sisterly love: ou/où on s’entrembrasseBecause French (especially Old French) does it better.

Because Medievalists hug better. And we share better. Including hugs. Come join our happy virtuous cycle.


(more…)

#Innovation – #MakePhilologyGreatAgain 

(more…)

Literary warm-up exercise for stretching imaginative muscles / un exercice d’échauffement littéraire : l’imagination au pouvoir

Margins and marginality are wonderful, as are their transgression and subversion and any play with them. But, as all wearers of glasses know, frames can be fun too.

Screen Shot 2017-03-15 at 8.09.13 PM

This is a piece about frames and framing. Updates seem to be turning it into an illustrated prosimetrical short story about liminality and its horrors. Which was unexpected and is weird. Blame the uncanny conjunction of borders and walls in the news, UBC, bande dessinée, Guy de Maupassant, and Marguerite Porete. (more…)