philology

31 August is Ken Campbell Day: diddling and doodling, seekers, and radical education as seeking learning outcomes


It is time for the annual pilgrimage.

Like last year’s pilgrimage post, this post is a “sticky” one for a whole academic term, all the way to its end and the end of the calendar year. It contains various kinds of “stickiness” played out in three four Acts: I. revisiting 2017, II. 2018 and III. Campbellian education in action, and IV. 2019 and learning outcomes.

I’ve also added a few Anarcoos because it seemed appropriate and, well, to quote my first PhD supervisor: “why not?”

IMG_9957ACT I: REVISITING 2017

Today is the anniversary of the death of Ken Campbell, anarchist polymath genius.

Reader of everything. Writer. Performer. Creator. Stand up comedian, speculative fictioneer, improviser, paranomasiac, marvelling revelling adventurer in existence.

Public outreach educator and life-long learning experimenter in ways beyond the wildest imaginings of Proper Professionals in these fields before they or these fields even existed. The next time you consider using words like “innovation,” “innovative,” “innovator”: have some respect. Think first. Check with reference to Ken. If philology provides a theoretical meaning, it is Ken who provides—incarnates—a reference-point for lived active practice. (more…)

The consolation and living magic of old poetry

img_7861“Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War”
British Library, 19 October 2018 to 19 February 2019.
Information: https://www.bl.uk/events/anglo-saxon-kingdoms

An exhibition just opened in London, at the British Library, which is by all accounts sublime and has been stunning colleagues who work in medieval English literature and history, and many other lovers of all things beautiful and old. (more…)

31 August is Ken Campbell Day: diddling and doodling, seekers, and radical education

It is time for the annual pilgrimage. So as to make this a slower and longer pilgrimage than last year, to commemorate a 10th anniversary (well, two: the death of a central person and the birth of a marginal blog), this post is was a “sticky” one for a whole academic term, all the way to its end and the end of the year; and it contains various kinds of “stickiness” played out in three Acts: revisiting 2017, 2018, and Campbellian education in action.

IMG_9957ACT I: REVISITING 2017

Today is the anniversary of the death of Ken Campbell, anarchist polymath genius.

Reader of everything. Writer. Performer. Creator. Stand up comedian, speculative fictioneer, improviser, paranomasiac, marvelling revelling adventurer in existence.

Public outreach educator and life-long learning experimenter in ways beyond the wildest imaginings of Proper Professionals in these fields before they or these fields even existed. The next time you consider using words like “innovation,” “innovative,” “innovator”: have some respect. Think first. Check with reference to Ken. If philology provides a theoretical meaning, it is Ken who provides—incarnates—a reference-point for lived active practice. (more…)

The Joy of Consent: Feeling Together (in some medieval Occitan poetry); FHIS research seminar (2 = talk + slides)

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a very short fable about medievalism, #medievaltwitter, and teaching

(February 2016 – August 2017)

Medievalists struggle with popular misconceptions. This, for example:AF79CBCA-C7F6-4B7F-97D5-7963BC14AF90

And these, which are not Medieval but Early Modern:

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From Charles McNamara, “In the Image of God: John Comenius and the First Children’s Picture Book,” in the Public Domain Review; on Comenius’s “Orbis Sensualium Pictus (or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures),” 1658.

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(more…)