educational leadership

Radical professionalism (2): it is not about appearances

“Radical professionalism” is an idea that goes above and beyond “professionalism” and that returns “professionalism” to its deep true conservative sense. This is the second of a series of posts. It started with a preamble, two weeks ago. This is the second of two posts looking at what professionalism is not, on false values that will be very familiar to readers of Medieval allegory and satire. It follows a first post on neutrality (false balance) yesterday. This second post is about appearances (seeming, or: false being and false value(s)) and their connection to appropriateness, propriety, and property. The third post looks at what professionalism is; and what, in the shape of a radical professionalism as modelled by radical academic professionals, it could be.
(more…)

Radical professionalism (1): it is not neutrality

IMG_9671
This is the first of a series of posts. It started with a preamble, two weeks ago. “Radical professionalism” is an idea that goes above and beyond “professionalism” and that returns “professionalism” to its deep true conservative sense. I’ll start by looking at what professionalism is not, in two posts on false values that will be very familiar to readers of Medieval allegory and satire: neutrality (false balance) and appearances (seeming, or: false being). The third post looks at what professionalism is; and what, in the shape of a radical professionalism as modelled by radical academic professionals, it could be.
(more…)

Teaching the “Roman de la Rose” in hyper-really allegorical times: Apocalypse Now

Previously on UBC Medieval Studies 301A: European Literature from the 5th to the 14th Century – “THE LIBERAL ARTS”:

Expanding an excerpt from the previous post, going beyond embedded screenshots, welcome to The Middle Week of the course en direct. 17-23 October 2016; with classes on the 18th and the 20th.

At the midpoint of the term, the course, and the book: expect chiasmic hinges. A week before Samhain: expect a thinning of the veils between realities. I didn’t expect that this would be the class where we digressed the most from The Rough Plan and where those digressions were all relevant: this was the set of class notes that expanded the most, from the preparatory pre-class version to the full version after the week’s classes. I certainly didn’t expect that this would be the class that really brought us all together, in delighted fascination at the actual mathematics of the number 666, as shown by an actual mathematician (whose final project was an allegory, a dystopian speculative fiction short story).

Expect the unexpected, as ever, in teaching.

(more…)

Statement of teaching philosophy: l’imagination au pouvoir*

img_5702

I see my teaching rôle as
a flexible facilitator
and catalyst
in knowledge-centred
higher education:
centred not on instructors
or students,
nor on active teaching
and passive being taught
or variations on that binary;
but on the finding,
making,
and shaping
together
of subject-matter and meaning,
in the adventure of learning itself. (more…)

Credo (2): Mashup remix: #4wordpedagogy + #UBC100


(more…)