education

Medievalising beginners’ French assignments & assessment: 2018 renovations & innovations (3), the next steps

This is the third of three posts on “innovative skill-based complex formative assessments.” The first post, two months ago, was about student projects, and how I’d changed them over the last year, learning from the students and from our work in the course. You could call this “interactive transformative learning.” The second post, from early June, was on the move from savoirs to savoir-faire to savoir-vivre, and student e-portfolios. This third one is in a drafty form; I’m posting it anyway. (I’m currently on annual leave and this post was delayed due to my being ill recently.)

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Medievalising beginners’ French assignments & assessment: 2018 renovations & innovations (2), savoir-vivre

(This and other medieval manuscript images punctuating this series of posts are via Emily Steiner (University of Pennsylvania), @PiersatPenn)

This is the second of three posts on “innovative skill-based complex formative assessments.” It is about individual savoir-vivre ePortfolios.  (more…)

interlude: World Otter Day

Man and Sea Otters. Susan Point (Musqueam), serigraph, 1981.

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Medievalising beginners’ French assignments & assessment: 2018 renovations & innovations (1)

(This and other medieval manuscript images punctuating this series of posts are via Emily Steiner (University of Pennsylvania), @PiersatPenn)

French courses here at UBC have changed considerably over the last two years. (more…)

SYLLABUS PART 3: HELP (2018)

LAST UPDATED: 2018-08-31

(The second general-purpose appendix to any syllabus.)
folon-villebleue2

I (Dr O’Brien) am sharing some general useful resources below: openly-accessible freely-available information from the University. I use these resources a lot in the advising side of my work, you might also find them helpful, and they could also help you to help someone else. There are many people here at UBC who can help; even if it is “just” talking to someone with whom you feel comfortable and whom you trust, who will listen to you, that alone is already a vital service.

The same goes for any need to talk and to find support, whether something has happened to you or to someone you know, and also if nothing has happened but you worry that it might. Even if sometimes this seems like an overwhelmingly large university, and impersonal through its size and complexity: UBC is a compassionate caring community, made up of individual human beings.

QUICK NAVIGATION:

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