medieval Occitan literature

Reading frogsong

Lecture notes from RMST 221B, WEEK 2 (as image files crashed on Canvas and UBC Blogs site)

  • TOPIC:
    Introduction: starting small with a frog in a poem

    • context: a bigger picture, whole book, intertextual network of books and other knowledge, and ecosystem
    • reading ecosystemically
  • READINGS:
    Prologues, prefaces, and bodies of knowledge:

    • Marie de France Lais (+ Fables) prologues
    • Michel de Montaigne “To the reader”
    • + (guided reading in Thursday class) I.1, II.18, III. 2 & 8
    • + (online meanderings) bestiaries and other Big Books Of All Knowledge
  • TUESDAY: Introduction to the Marie & Montaigne introductions (Marie, “Prologue”; Montaigne, “To the reader”) and to this world; via frogs
  • THURSDAY: mainly Marie Lais “Prologue” + Montaigne “To the reader,” plus I.1 + excerpts from II.18, III.2, III.8 on what he’s doing and why; keeping frogs and their small stoical wisdom in mind
  • FOR THURSDAY:
    • read Marie Lais prologue
    • read Montaigne “To the reader”
    • read Montaigne book I essay 1 and imagine that we are discussing frogs rather than humans
  • TO DO for next week: reading commentary on Canvas (commenting about this week’s Marie and Montaigne readings; one of the bonus readings at the end, an excerpt from the Pancatantra, provides an example of commenting on and discussing reading; there is also more information on Canvas)

TUESDAY LECTURE NOTES

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Translating rape in “Flamenca” (2)

In the previous post, we saw how the rape of Flamenca was read and written by several translators: from a mysterious medieval hand behind a marginal manicule, to translations published over the last ten years. That is: how, in the narrow and broad senses, her rape was “translated.” This second post looks at how rape was translated out of Flamenca: going beyond the usual senses of translation that include transposition, movement to a different place, away from one language and culture and into another; this translation is one of displacement and removal. Flamenca’s rape is translated out of existence. (more…)

Translating rape in “Flamenca” (1)

Welcome to the first of a set of posts about translation, about scholarly editions as translations, about editorial decisions being individual ethical decisions made by people in a cultural context, and about scholarly responsibility and responsible scholarship. And about the 13th-century Occitan Romance of Flamenca. (more…)

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas …

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas. All of them had a kernel of narratio fabulosa truth in common.

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On translation (including a very short story)

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