ethics

Radical professionalism (4): it exists and it’s medievalist

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Medieval, medievalism, and medievalist radical professionalism
Source: https://www.twitter.com/erik_kwakkel/status/910141541724966912

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Radical professionalism (3): what it is and what it could be

Images above: the Winchester Psalter, British Library Cotton MS Nero C IV – Herrad of Landsberg, Hortus deliciarum – The Tree of Life, Gua Tewet, Borneo

“Radical professionalism” goes beyond “professionalism” and returns the latter to its deep true conservative sense. This is the longest in a series of posts. The project started with thinking about con– and pro– words in spring 2016, in relation to local (university) current events. The first “deliverables” were some images at the end of a self-flagellating work in progress post in July and a preamble in mid-August. Then followed two posts looking at what professionalism is not, on false values that will be very familiar to readers of Medieval allegory and satire: a first post on neutrality (false balance) and a second post about appearances (seeming, or: false being and false value(s)) and their connection to appropriateness, propriety, and property. There were two other entremets posts (here and here). This present post looks at what professionalism is; and what, in the shape of a radical professionalism as modelled by radical academic professionals, it could be. [UPDATED AFTER POSTING TO ADD] In a fourth post, we’ll see how radical professionalism actually exists, in the world of Medieval Studies. (more…)

Radical professionalism (2): it is not about appearances

“Radical professionalism” is an idea that goes above and beyond “professionalism” and that returns “professionalism” to its deep true conservative sense. This is the second of a series of posts. It started with a preamble, two weeks ago. This is the second of two posts looking at what professionalism is not, on false values that will be very familiar to readers of Medieval allegory and satire. It follows a first post on neutrality (false balance) yesterday. This second post is about appearances (seeming, or: false being and false value(s)) and their connection to appropriateness, propriety, and property. The third post looks at what professionalism is; and what, in the shape of a radical professionalism as modelled by radical academic professionals, it could be.
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Radical professionalism (1): it is not neutrality

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This is the first of a series of posts. It started with a preamble, two weeks ago. “Radical professionalism” is an idea that goes above and beyond “professionalism” and that returns “professionalism” to its deep true conservative sense. I’ll start by looking at what professionalism is not, in two posts on false values that will be very familiar to readers of Medieval allegory and satire: neutrality (false balance) and appearances (seeming, or: false being). The third post looks at what professionalism is; and what, in the shape of a radical professionalism as modelled by radical academic professionals, it could be.
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Open letter: student support

(I just sent this to my own students: UBC colleagues, please feel free to share any part of it or the resources herein, they might be helpful to others too.)

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Dear students, colleagues, fellow citizens of the UBC community,

I’m writing this because I promised a colleague that I would say something to students, and because, like many people at UBC, I care about UBC and about students; I also spend a lot of time on campus due to working and living here, and what I’m going to write about is something that matters to this community as a whole. I’ll probably not say the right things or say them properly so I hope you get the general underlying ideas and forgive me for expressing them clumsily and too hastily.

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Yesterday, a violent assault—an attempted murder—happened here on your, our, campus. (more…)

On clarity & transparency

 

(not UBC: Clare Hall, University of Cambridge: exemplary intellectual environment)

 
Things have been happening at UBC. I am optimistic. That may of course change: I may become less hopeful, or more hopeful. I am of course hoping for the latter, because it’s better to be happy than sad. Especially when you add to your own happiness that of other people.  (more…)