feminism

Christine de Pizan, “Ditié de Jehanne d’Arc”

All images in this post: London, British Library, Harley MS 4431 (Christine de Pizan, but not her Joan of Arc)

As promised in the previous post, here is a PDF facing-column text: Christine de Pizan on Joan of Arc, (more…)

From Joan of Arc to Wonder Woman via Christine de Pizan, on #medievaltwitter

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Twittering collage comics: a fine, noble, and ancient art

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Next post: on Christine de Pizan

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Since the advent of The Post-Ironic Dictatorship Of The Post-Proletariat in the USA, there’s been a certain resurgence of interest in—and a renewed appreciation of the eternal timeliness and relevance of—the allegorical, the apocalyptic, and active women; writers, makers, and shapers. It’s not all about The Handmaid’s Tale; I have a sense that Christine de Pizan may be having a resurgence. Renaissance. Renovation. Consider this a tip-off on trend-spotting, cool-hunting, and innovation. (Also, on these subjects, if you’re looking for something else to read, may I recommend William Gibson’s Pattern Recognition and Zero History).

Anyway. I’ll be reposting a bunch of stuff from recent Twitter in a next blog post on here. Much will be from today: being the feast day of Joan of Arc, burned at the stake in Rouen on this day in 1431, and whose first biography (in her lifetime, in 1429) was by Christine.  (more…)

Statement of teaching philosophy: l’imagination au pouvoir*

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I see my teaching rôle as
a flexible facilitator
and catalyst
in knowledge-centred
higher education:
centred not on instructors
or students,
nor on active teaching
and passive being taught
or variations on that binary;
but on the finding,
making,
and shaping
together
of subject-matter and meaning,
in the adventure of learning itself. (more…)

#femfog avant la lettre, #fembuée, & #femflow

(For Eileen Joy.)

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(Also a post about how reading works. (Book of Hours, The Master of Evert Zoudenbalch. Active Utrecht, ca. 1460. Via Miranda Bloem a.k.a. @Zweder_Masters))

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