liberal arts

a very short fable about medievalism, #medievaltwitter, and teaching

(February 2016 – August 2017)

Medievalists struggle with popular misconceptions. This, for example:AF79CBCA-C7F6-4B7F-97D5-7963BC14AF90

And these, which are not Medieval but Early Modern:

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From Charles McNamara, “In the Image of God: John Comenius and the First Children’s Picture Book,” in the Public Domain Review; on Comenius’s “Orbis Sensualium Pictus (or The World of Things Obvious to the Senses drawn in Pictures),” 1658.

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Radical professionalism (4): it exists and it’s medievalist

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Medieval, medievalism, and medievalist radical professionalism
Source: https://www.twitter.com/erik_kwakkel/status/910141541724966912

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University undergraduate liberal arts education is #AntiFascistSFF

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A special bonus post in celebration of the Happy Academic New Year; all images (except one) are from the brilliant Scarfolk Council (scarfolk.blogspot.com), which you MUST visit forthwith if you have not already done so.  (more…)

“Le Roman de la Rose”: fear, danger, & walls vs. #bridgesnotwalls #NoWallsNoBan #LoveTrumpsHate

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Teaching the “Roman de la Rose” in hyper-really allegorical times: Apocalypse Now

Previously on UBC Medieval Studies 301A: European Literature from the 5th to the 14th Century – “THE LIBERAL ARTS”:

Expanding an excerpt from the previous post, going beyond embedded screenshots, welcome to The Middle Week of the course en direct. 17-23 October 2016; with classes on the 18th and the 20th.

At the midpoint of the term, the course, and the book: expect chiasmic hinges. A week before Samhain: expect a thinning of the veils between realities. I didn’t expect that this would be the class where we digressed the most from The Rough Plan and where those digressions were all relevant: this was the set of class notes that expanded the most, from the preparatory pre-class version to the full version after the week’s classes. I certainly didn’t expect that this would be the class that really brought us all together, in delighted fascination at the actual mathematics of the number 666, as shown by an actual mathematician (whose final project was an allegory, a dystopian speculative fiction short story).

Expect the unexpected, as ever, in teaching.

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