medievalisings: comparative contemporary commentary

Translating rape in “Flamenca” (1)

Welcome to the first of a set of posts about translation, about scholarly editions as translations, about editorial decisions being individual ethical decisions made by people in a cultural context, and about scholarly responsibility and responsible scholarship. And about the 13th-century Occitan Romance of Flamenca. (more…)

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas …

Once upon a time, there were many Flamencas. All of them had a kernel of narratio fabulosa truth in common.

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The consolation and living magic of old poetry

img_7861“Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War”
British Library, 19 October 2018 to 19 February 2019.
Information: https://www.bl.uk/events/anglo-saxon-kingdoms

An exhibition just opened in London, at the British Library, which is by all accounts sublime and has been stunning colleagues who work in medieval English literature and history, and many other lovers of all things beautiful and old. (more…)

Guillaume Apollinaire and the seven-year itch


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Work in progress: remembering there’s a “HAG” in hagiography, inspired by Saint Enimia on her feast-day today

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Bibliothèque nationale de France MS lat. 913,
the Office and Life of St Enimia.
Latin, c. 1300-10.
?Mende (Lozère, in the Gévaudan, Languedoc; a stone’s throw or short dragon-flight across the Causses from Ste-Énimie).

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