medieval

Happy medieval eclipse

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“We will, we will, eclipse you”

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Christine de Pizan, “Ditié de Jehanne d’Arc”

All images in this post: London, British Library, Harley MS 4431 (Christine de Pizan, but not her Joan of Arc)

As promised in the previous post, here is a PDF facing-column text: Christine de Pizan on Joan of Arc, (more…)

Happy #HugAMedievalistDay

Hug a Medievalist.

Because #medievaltwitter is amongst the finest public scholarship, breaking barriers of academia, bringing “outsiders” in.

Because Medievalists are able to go beyond the weaker—impoverished and impoverishing—recent idea of out-reach, back to its roots and underlying essential qualities, where they can perform alchemical philological magic to reveal a potent quintessence and share that openly and freely and equitably with the world for the greater and limitless enrichment of all. Why would you “perform outreach” when you could in-embrace-one-other instead, in brotherly or sisterly love: ou/où on s’entrembrasseBecause French (especially Old French) does it better.

Because Medievalists hug better. And we share better. Including hugs. Come join our happy virtuous cycle.


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#WhanthatAprilleDay16 – Guilhem de Peitieus / Old Occitan

Phylologystes unite, lat us maken melodye

  
This post is for
mon aisimen et aizi
mon compagnon en eisil
celui per cui fui trobatz
alter dicat:

Guilhem de Peitieus (1071 – 1127) (more…)

#HugAMedievalist

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It’s not too late: here in this time-zone, there’s an hour left for hugging medievalists. Here is a round-up of the medievalist huggery that’s being going on today over in the Twitterverse.

First, an explanatory note on Medievalists, why they have a Day online, and why hugging is a fitting tribute.

  
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Democratic “Flamenca”: read it online for free, and relatively cheaply in paperback

Images in the rest of this post are linked to their places of origin (online project, publisher’s website page for an edition) and open in new tabs/windows.

  • two online resources
  • four paperbacks, published between 2008 and 2015, ranging in price from €9.20 to €40.00

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NEWS: “Flamenca” (UPDATED with pictures)

Yes! Finally, Flamenca–that great and marvellous Old Occitan romance–has been added to the happy family of Medieval texts that is the “Lettres Gothiques” series, edited by the great and marvellous Michel Zink, and housed at the Livre de Poche.

Flamenca has been previously published in paperback, again in a facing-page bilingual edition: Jean-Charles Huchet’s version for UGE in their “10/18 bibliothèque médiévale” series. That was back in 1988 and it’s been out of print for a while. I’d been waiting and hoping for a good new Lettres Gothiques or Champion Classiques. Being as they are paragons of good bookly virtue: well done editions of the original text, nice translations into modern French that are usually also elegant and pleasing, beauteous introductions (à la Oxford World’s Classics or Penguin Classics), plus some fine critical apparatus, bibliography, the usual. All in the well-formed package that is a good paparback: quality paper and typeface, usually a pretty cover, et à un prix bien démocratique.

I am happy. I am happy because this brings a fine literary work to a wider audience, including enabling its teaching to students; being in an easily-obtained cheaper series makes it easier to put on reading-lists. I am happy for Flamenca, Guillem, Archimbaut, Margarida, Alis, the anonymous authors, anonymous scribes and all other involved in the text and its making. And I’m happy as part of a community of happy people, we lucky few not-very-many who know and love Flamenca. That last happiness is a very Nehamasian happiness, of a community formed and bonded through shared taste.

I haven’t read it yet, having only just heard the news via the Société Guilhem IX (thanks Topher), after which I immediately ordered a copy online. Knowing this series, I would more or less very nearly guarantee that it will be good. Even if it were not, the fact that it’s become accessible in cheaper paperback (once again) is a great and marvellous thing, and to be celebrated. May the joy and enjoyment spread!

To find the new Flamenca, make ingenious use of your engine of choice (as it were and with apologies to Flamenca) to find ISBN 9782253082569. Here’s the information from the publishers:

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possible the most important Medieval news of the last month

Codex Calixtinus found in garage

BBC News, 2012-07-05

courtly love: a bibliography

(slightly revised, updated, and reissued; may be further revised in the future; it should, I hope, provide a useful starting-point for people new to the area)

Allen, Peter B. The Art of Love: Amatory Fiction from Ovid to the Romance of the Rose. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1992.

Auerbach, Erich. Literary Language and its Public in Late Latin Antiquity and in the Middle Ages. Trans. Ralph Mannheim. Princeton: Bollingen, 1965.

—. Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature. Trans. Willard R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton U.P., 1953.

Bähler, Ursula. Gaston Paris et la philology romane. Geneva: Droz, 2004.

Bezzola, Reto R. Les Origines et la formation de la littérature courtoise en Occident (500-1200). Paris: Champion, 1944-63.

Bloch, R. Howard. Medieval Misogyny and the Invention of Western Romantic Love. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1990.

Boase, R. The Origin and Meaning of Courtly Love. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1977.

Camproux, Charles. Le “joy d’amour” du troubadour (jeu et joie d’amour). Montepellier: Causse et Castelnau, 1965.

Cherchi, Paolo. Andreas and the Ambiguity of Courtly Love.

Cheyette, Fredric L. Ermengard of Narbonne and the World of the Troubadours. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 2001.

Cholakian, Rouben Charles. Troubadour Lyric: A Psychocritical Reading. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1990.

Curtius, Ernst Robert. European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages. Trans. Willard R. Trask. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1953.

Denomy, Alexander Joseph. “An Enquiry into the Nature of Courtly Love.” Mediaeval Studies VI (1944): 175-260.

The Heresy of Courtly Love. New York: MacMullen, 1947.

Donaldson, E. Talbot. “The Myth of Courtly Love.” Ventures 5 (1965): 16-23, republished in Speaking of Chaucer (London: Athlone, 1970): 154-63.

Duby, Georges. Medieval Marriage: Two Models from the Twelfth Century. Trans. Elborg Forster. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1978.

Le Chevalier, la femme et le prêtre. Le mariage dans la France féodale. Paris: Hachette, 1981.

Ferrante, Joan M. “Cortes’ Amor in Medieval Texts.” Speculum 55 (1980): 695.

Frappier. Jean. Amour courtois et table ronde. Geneva: Droz, 1973.

Huchet, Jean-Charles. Littérature médiévale et psychanalyse: pour une clinique littéraire. Paris: P.U.F., 1990.

Kay, Sarah. “Courts, Clerks, and Courtly Love.” In The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Romance. Ed. Roberta L. Krueger. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000: 81-96.

Köhler, Erich. Trobador Lyrik und Höfischer Roman. Berlin: Rütter und Loening, 1962.

Kristeva, Julia. “Les Troubadours: du ‘grand chant courtois’ au récit allégorique.” In Histoires d’amour. Paris: Denoël, 1983: 263-76.

Lacan, Jacques. “L’Amour courtois en anamorphose.” In Le Séminaire de Jacques Lacan. Livre VII: L’Éthique de la psychanalyse, 1959-60. Texte établi par Jacques-Alain Miller. Paris: Le Seuil, 1986: 167-84.

Lazar, Moshé. Amour courtois et “fin’amors” dans la littérature du XIIe siècle. Paris: Klincksieck, 1964.

Le Goff, Jacques. La Civilisation de l’Occident médiéval. Paris: Arthaud, 1964.

Pour un autre Moyen Âge: temps, travail et culture en Occident. Paris: Gallimard, 1977.

Le Goff, Jacques, Roger Chartier, and Jacques Revel, eds. La Nouvellehistoire. Paris: C.E.P.L., 1978.

Lewis, Clive Staples. The Allegory of Love. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1936.

Menocal, María Rosa. The Arabic Role in Medieval Literature: A Forgotten Heritage. Philadephia: U Pennsylvania P, 1990.

Nelli, René. L’Érotique des troubadours. Toulouse: Privat, 1963.

Newman, F.X., ed., The Meaning of Courtly Love: Papers of the First Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton. March 17-18, 1967. Albany:  SUNY P, 1968.

O’Brien, Juliet. “Contexts poetic and erotic: trobar amor clusa e cortesa.” Ch. 1 in “Trobar Cor(s): Erotics and Poetics in Flamenca.” Ph.D. diss., Princeton U, 2006: 27-143.

— “Reading (and) Courtly Love in Flamenca, via the Charrette.” In Dame Philology’s Charrette: Approaching Medieval Textuality through Chrétien’s Lancelot, Essays in Memory of Karl D. Uitti. Ed. Gina Greco and Ellen Thorington. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (ACMRS) at Arizona State University, 2012.

Paris, Gaston. “Études sur les romans de la Table Ronde: Lancelot.” Romania 12 (1883): 459-534. Online at http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k16021k.r=.langfr

Robertson, D.W. Jr. “Some Medieval Doctrines of Love.” In A Preface to Chaucer. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1962: 391-503.

— “The Concept of Courtly Love as an Impediment to the Understanding of Medieval Texts.” In Newman 1968: 1-18.

Rougemont, Denis de. L’Amour et l’Occident. Paris: Plon, 1972; rev. of 1939 ed.

Uitti, Karl D. “Remarks on Old French Narrative: Courtly Love and Poetic Form (I).” Romance Philology 26 (1972): 92.

Žižek, Slavoj. “Courtly Love, or Woman as Thing.” In The Metastases of Enjoyment. London: Verso, 1994: 148-73.

online resources: manuscripts & manuscript studies

Originally compiled for the UBC Early Romance Studies Research Cluster Site

How to become king of the world: Ensenhamen, in Matfré Ermengaud, "Breviari d'Amors" (late 13th c.; early 14th c. ms.)RESOURCES FOR MANUSCRIPTS ONLINE AND ON MANUSCRIPT STUDIES (PALAEOGRAPHY, PHILOLOGY, CODICOLOGY, AND DIGITAL/ELECTRONIC PHILOLOGY)

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